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May 1, 1602
In 1602 William Shakespeare negotiated with John Combe for the purchase of 107 acres for £320, a considerable sum. Two copies were made of the deed conveying this land.
May 31, 1602
Richard Quiney was buried on May 31, 1602, as recorded in the Holy Trinity Church parish register. On October 2, 1601, he had been sworn in as bailiff for the following twelve months and was thus described as “Mr.
begun May 28, 1602
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
May 1, 1602
John Combe was a wealthy member of a family settled in Stratford since the 1530s. In 1593 he had acquired these 107 acres of land from Rice Griffin, with his equally wealthy uncle and lawyer, William Combe of Warwick, apparently acting in the capacity of trustee.
1602
In 1602, two years after the first edition, the second edition of Henry V, known as Quarto 2, was printed by Thomas Creede for Thomas Pavier.
1602
This is the foot of fine, one of the three copies of the final concord ratifying Shakespeare’s purchase of New Place in 1602. It has been filed with other Warwickshire “feet” among the records of the Court of Common Pleas since 1602.
1603
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
August 9-17 1603
This fragment from the account book of a stationer in southern England provides evidence of a bookseller’s stock in the early seventeenth-century, with a tally of items sold over the course of a few days in August 1603.
1603
John Davies of Hereford was one of the most prolific poets of his age. He was born about 1565 and died in 1618, making him William Shakespeare’s nearly exact contemporary.
May 19, 1603
Although James VI of Scotland was proclaimed king of England on March 24, 1603, it took him over a month to arrive in London.

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