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Printed as 1600, i.e. 1619
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
Printed as 1600, i.e. 1619
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
1620
John Tyler’s The Praise of Hemp-Seed was first published in 1620 by Edward Allde for H. Gosson. The poem includes an early remembrance of Shakespeare four years after his death, praising paper for keeping his art alive (image 2): 
1622
The sixth edition of Henry IV Part 1 was one of three Shakespearean playbooks printed in 1622, the year before the first edition of his collected plays, Mr William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies, also known as “the First Folio,” was published.
1622
This is the first edition of Othello, printed in 1622, around eighteen years after it was first written and performed. It was entered into the Stationers’ Company Register on October 6, 1621 by Thomas Walkley, who then had it printed by Nicholas Okes.
1622
This is the sixth edition of Richard III, printed in 1622 for Matthew Law. However, Thomas Creede, the printer for the second through fifth editions, died in 1616 and Law turned to Thomas Purfoot to print this edition.
1622
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
ca. 1622
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
1623
The first collected edition of William Shakespeare’s plays is a celebrated volume known as the "First Folio." It is called a “Folio” because of the large-format size of the book.
circa 1623
In 1623, the antiquarian Sir Edward Dering turned the two parts of Henry IV into a single play, cutting 3000 lines from both. Dering’s adaptation is the earliest known manuscript copy, and first documented amateur performance of, a Shakespeare play (or rather, parts of two plays).

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