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1605
This is the fourth edition of Richard III, printed in 1605. On June 25, 1603, Andrew Wise, who published the first three editions, transferred the rights to Matthew Law.
July 24, 1605
An attorney would have initially drafted the deed conveying the lease of half the Stratford tithes to Shakespeare, before a clerk or scrivener engrossed the final copy.
ca. 1606
In several scenes, the Cambridge University play Progress to Parnassus mocks the literary tastes and talents of the London commercial stage, depicting Shakespeare as a popular but unsophisticated playwright and poet.
ca. August 1, 1606
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Printed as 1602, possibly 1607
The title page of the eighth edition of Venus and Adonis claims that it was printed in 1602 by William Leake, who had acquired the rights to Venus and Adonis in 1596. However, it was printed illegally in 1607 by Robert Raworth.
1607
The fifth edition of Lucrece was printed in 1607 by Nicholas Okes for John Harrison III, who had also published the fourth edition.
August 17, 1608
On August 17, 1608, William Shakespeare (or his family or agents acting on his behalf) began an action in the Stratford court of record to recover a debt of £6 from John Addenbrooke. The case dragged on until at least June 7, 1609.
1608
Arthur Johnson published The Merry Devil of Edmonton in 1608, declaring the play to “hath beene sundry times Acted, / by his Maiesties Seruants, at the / Globe, on the banke-side.” In the 1630s, the play was bound in a volume of eight quartos in the library of King Charles I
Imprinted as 1602, i.e. 1608
The ninth edition of Venus and Adonis was printed for William Leake and was dated 1602 on the title page, just like the eighth edition. However, Harry Farr argued in 1923 that it was actually printed in 1608, and identifies the printer as Humphrey Lownes.
December 21, 1608
On August 17, 1608, William Shakespeare (or his family or agents acting on his behalf) began an action in the Stratford court of record to recover a debt of £6 from John Addenbrooke. The case dragged on until at least June 7, 1609.

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