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All Documents

1599
This 1599 printing is the only surviving copy of the sixth edition of Venus and Adonis, first published in 1593.
ca. 1595- 1600
In 1602, the herald Ralph Brooke challenged 23 coats of arms granted by William Dethick, including the arms originally granted to Shakespeare’s father, John Shakespeare, and now belonging to William Shakespeare.
1600
Like other plays from the period, Shakespeare's plays were meant to be read both as stories and as sources for sententiae, or memorable aphorisms.
1600
Englands Parnassus is one of two printed commonplace books, or collections of extracts organized by topic, compiled by Robert Allott, and was printed shortly after John Bodenham’s Bel-vedére.
June 26, 1601
James Burbage died in 1597. His sons Richard and Cuthbert, who were principal shareholders of the Globe, inherited Blackfriars Theater from their father. In 1601, they purchased rooms adjacent to it. Their signatures on the “bargain and sale” indenture appear in the photo above.
1601
Shakespeare’s poem, now known as “The Phoenix and the Turtle,” was appended to a collection of poetry called Loves Martyr printed in 1601.This volume mostly consists of Robert Chester’s long and obscure narrative poem about the love between the phoenix and a dove
1602
These two documents are the buyer's and vendor's copies of the 1602 final concord for Shakespeare's purchase of New Place. Shakespeare purchased New Place, one of the largest houses in Stratford-upon-Avon, from William Underhill in 1597.
1602
This is the foot of fine, one of the three copies of the final concord ratifying Shakespeare’s purchase of New Place in 1602. It has been filed with other Warwickshire “feet” among the records of the Court of Common Pleas since 1602.
ca. 1602
In 1602, York herald Ralph Brooke challenged 23 coats of arms granted by William Dethick, including the arms originally granted to Shakespeare’s father, John Shakespeare, and now belonging to William Shakespeare.
February 2 and March 13, 1602
The earliest mention of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night is in a notebook of gossip, observations and sermon notes kept by John Manningham while a law student at Middle Temple, one of the Inns of Court in London.

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