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Shakespeare Documented is still growing! Currently, two thirds of the descriptions and 98% of the images are available in the exhibition. Descriptive text will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Visit our About page to learn more about the project scope.

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1596
Edward III was published anonymously in 1596, and was one of three plays attributed to Shakespeare in the catalogue of books appended to Thomas Goffe’s The Careless Shepherdess in 1656.
August 11, 1596
Hamnet, William and Anne Shakespeare’s only son, was buried on August 11, 1596, according to the Holy Trinity Church parish register. Next to the entry, an “X” added by a later hand highlights its significance. He was eleven years old.
November 29, 1596
The enrolled entry known to Shakespeare scholars as the “Langley writ” was recorded in the Court of King’s Bench between October 29, 1596 and January 24, 1597. The writ constitutes presumptive evidence that William Shakespeare, formerly of St.
January 26, 1597
On January 29, 1597 John Shakespeare sold his neighbor, George Badger, a strip of land on the north-western boundary of John’s Henley Street property (now known as the Birthplace). The conveyance shown here is in Latin.
May 8, 1597
In May 1597, the freehold title to New Place passed from William Underhill to William Shakespeare. This would normally have been recorded in a formal deed of conveyance, signed by the both parties.
May 2-9, 1597
In May 1597, the freehold title to New Place passed from William Underhill to William Shakespeare. This would normally have been recorded in a formal deed of conveyance, signed by both parties.
1597
Richard III was first printed in 1597, and the title page enumerates the various exploits to be found within, including Richard’s “treacherous Plots,” the “pittiefull murther of his innocent nephews,” his “tyrannicall vsurpation,” and of course h
1597
For details about the 1597 foot of fine, see the general essay for Shakespeare's purchase of New Place. The foot has a useful endorsement (the second image) recording the occasions when the final concord was "proclaimed" in open court, as requi
1597
Romeo and Juliet was one of Shakespeare’s most popular plays from the moment it was first performed and printed.
ca. August 27, 1597
This document, part of the Rye Chamberlain’s Accounts, includes an August 1597 entry for a payment of 20 shillings to Shakespeare’s company, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men.

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