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May 8, 1597
In May 1597, the freehold title to New Place passed from William Underhill to William Shakespeare. This would normally have been recorded in a formal deed of conveyance, signed by the both parties.
May 4, 1597
For further details about the 1597 exemplification, see the general essay for Shakespeare's purchase of New Place.
1597
Romeo and Juliet was one of Shakespeare’s most popular plays from the moment it was first performed and printed.
1597
For details about the 1597 foot of fine, see the general essay for Shakespeare's purchase of New Place. The foot has a useful endorsement (the second image) recording the occasions when the final concord was "proclaimed" in open court, as requi
January 26, 1597
On January 29, 1597 John Shakespeare sold his neighbor, George Badger, a strip of land on the north-western boundary of John’s Henley Street property (now known as the Birthplace). The conveyance shown here is in Latin.
November 24, 1598
While in London during the autumn of 1598, Richard Quiney received at least four letters from Daniel Baker, written on October 17, October 26, November 13 and November 24, the last of which is shown here. Baker addresses Quiney as his uncle, and refers to Quiney’s wife as his aunt.
1598
The borough chamberlain, in his accounts submitted in January 1598, included an entry that at some point in the previous twelve months he paid “Mr Shaxpere” 10 pence for “on lod of ston,” one of a set of five payments made towards the repair of the bridge over t
1598
William Shakespeare's name first appeared on the title pages of three plays in 1598, including this edition of Love's Labor's Lost. Fourteen copies of this edition are known to survive. The sub-title, "Newly corrected and augmented By W.
1598
Richard III was an immediate success in the bookshops of London. Andrew Wise published the first edition in 1597, and copies seem to have sold out very quickly, since he published the play again the next year, in 1598, as shown here.
1598
This edition of Henry IV Part 1 survives only as a single gathering of four leaves from a copy of the quarto published in 1598.

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