MENU

Shakespeare Documented is still growing! Currently, two thirds of the descriptions and 98% of the images are available in the exhibition. Descriptive text will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Visit our About page to learn more about the project scope.

To learn more about searching and using Shakespeare Documented please visit Exploring the Exhibition.

SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING

Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!

Filter the documents by tag(s)

Printed as 1600, i.e. 1619
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
1619
Thomas Pavier’s 1619 reissue of A Yorkshire Tragedie, now printed by William Jaggard, repeats the attribution to “W. Shakespeare” and places his name more prominently in capitals, but removes the information about playing company and theater.
1619
Published in 1619, this second edition of The Merry Wives of Windsor was part of the collection of Shakespeare’s plays commonly known as the Pavier Quartos. The publisher, Arthur Johnson, also published the first edition in 1602.
July 8, 1619
The Merchant of Venice was originally entered into the Stationers' Register on July 22, 1598, by James Roberts.
April 20, 1619
In 1606 John Witter of Mortlake, Surrey, married Anne Phillips, widow of Augustine Phillips, a member of the King’s Men who had died in 1605.
April 28, 1619
In 1606 John Witter of Mortlake, Surrey, married Anne Phillips, widow of Augustine Phillips, a member of the King’s Men who had died in 1605.
May 10, 1619
In 1606 John Witter of Mortlake, Surrey, married Anne Phillips, widow of Augustine Phillips, a member of the King’s Men who had died in 1605.
Imprint 1600, i.e. 1619
The 1619 quarto of Sir John Oldcastle Part 1 is the first to attribute the play to Shakespeare, some three years after his death.
1617- 1619
John Weever, a 17th century antiquary, spent approximately three decades gathering notes for his magisterial Ancient Funeral Monuments (1631). One of his surviving notebooks includes notes on Stratford-upon-Avon, with transcriptions from William Shakespeare’s funeral monument.
ca. 1620
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!

Pages