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1611
The third edition of Pericles was printed in 1611. It retains certain textual errors introduced in the second edition, indicating that the third edition was based on the previous one.
1611
This is the third edition of Titus Andronicus. On April 19, 1602 Thomas Millington transferred the right to publish the play to Thomas Pavier. However, the third edition was not printed until 1611, and lists Edward White, not Pavier, as the publisher.
1611
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
1611
This is the only surviving copy of The Anuals of great Brittaine, a 1611 reissue of Robert Chester’s 1601 Loves Martyr, which included the Shakespeare poem now known as “The Phoenix and the Turtle.” The Anuals is made up of sheets from the 1601 edition
1611
The Revels Book of 1611–12 records that the court saw only two of Shakespeare’s plays. This is five fewer than the seven performances recorded in the 1604–5 accounts.
ca. Easter 1610 - Hilary 1611
SHAKESPEARE DOCUMENTED IS STILL GROWING! Descriptive content and transcriptions will continue to be added, updated and expanded. Check back for regular updates!
December 16, 1611
Thomas Lord Cromwell was originally entered into Liber C of the Stationers' Company on August 11, 1602 by the printer William Cotton for the publisher William Jones.
1611
In the last year of his life, the astrologer Simon Forman (1552-1611) recorded his impressions of the plots and lessons of four plays he saw at the Globe, three of which were by Shakespeare: Macbeth on April 20, 1611 (he mistakenly writes 1610), a production of Richard II by an
1611
This book is the only surviving play manuscript used by Shakespeare’s company, the King’s Men. It is also the only surviving copy of the play itself, which became known as The Second Maiden’s Tragedy.
December 4, 1611
On December 4, 1611, by the deed shown here, the wealthy widow, Elizabeth Quiney, and her eldest son, Adrian Quiney, sold a sizeable house in Wood Street, Stratford-upon-Avon, to William Mountford. The deed has three tags with seals attached (shown here in the first image).

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